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Coins
  This Week In Coin News
 
December 1, 2012

The Sunrise Collection of Islamic Coins
Numismatics on the Screen
Website Tips: Take Charge Of Your Email Preferences
This Week's Top Ten
Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!
Employment Opportunities
Around Heritage Auctions
Instant Quiz
Is It Time To Sell? 2013 January Orlando FUN Auctions
Current Auctions: November 29 - December 2 US Coin Signature Auction - Houston #1177, Internet Coin Auctions


  Collector News

The Sunrise Collection of Islamic Coins

In the Eighth Century AD, while Western Europe was mired in the Dark Ages, Islamic Civilization stormed out of the Arabian Peninsula and swept over the lands formerly held by the Roman and Persian Empires. Millions of new adherents and subjects were introduced to a vibrant culture rooted in veneration of the Prophet Mohammed and the religion he founded. Islamic art, science, and literature brought a brilliant light to a formerly darkened world. Soon after the establishment of the vast medieval Islamic Empire, its dynastic rulers began striking coins that hewed closely to the Koranic and Biblical ban on "graven images", while finding their own unique and beautiful blend of calligraphic art, Islamic religion, and floral aesthetic design.

Mughal, Jahangir, AH 1014-1037 / AD 1605-1627, gold zodiac mohur (10.89g, 22mm).
Painstakingly assembled over a 40 year period, the Sunrise Collection, to be featured in our upcoming 2013 January 6-7 Ancient & World Coin Signature Auction is one of the most comprehensive private collections ever put together tracing the magnificent history of Islam as a world power, with a special focus on two of its most important states — Persia and Mughal India. Comprising nearly 800 coins in gold, silver, and bronze, the Sunrise Collection spans nearly a millennium and a half, from within a few decades after the Hijra (AD 621/AH1), through the end of the Qajar Dynasty (AD 1794-1925/AH 1174-1305). Also included are early Arab-Sassanian coins, important Arabic coins of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties (AD 661-1258/AH 41-638), the Seljuq and Ottoman Empires (AD 1071-1923/AH 451-1303), and of neighboring Nepal and Tibet. With an overriding emphasis on quality and rarity, the Sunrise Collection bears testimony to the collector's dedication, outstanding eye, knowledge of history, and love of his heritage.
Mughal, Jahangir, AH 1015-1037 / AD 1605-1628, gold portrait mohur.
"The collector began assembling a remarkable collection of Islamic Coins nearly forty years ago, always seeking the finest quality and the greatest rarity," said Stephen Album, author of Checklist of Islamic Coins and prime cataloger for the Sunrise Collection. "As his knowledge and financial position improved, he constantly searched not just for the rarest coins, but the artistically most magnificent. The collector understood that even moderately rare coins of outstanding quality were far more important than mediocre examples."

"The consignor's own Iranian background allowed him to recognize the finest Iranian coins," continued Album, "an ability that spread to Mughal and later Indian coins, whose style was derived from Iranian traditions, and were inscribed in the Persian language. Most of the specimens are of such awesome quality that comparable pieces may never again become available. I have witnessed the collector's ability to sort through a group of many hundreds of coins and select the one or two extraordinary pieces that are the fabulous gems, unlikely ever to be found again. This is not just a large collection — it is a work of art!"

Safavid, Sulayman I, 1078-1105 / 1668-1694, gold 16 ashrafis.

Safavid, Sulayman I, 1078-1105 / 1668-1694, gold 16 ashrafis.

Qajar, Fath 'Ali Shah, AH 1212-1250 / AD 1797-1834, gold 5 toman

Qajar, Fath 'Ali Shah, AH 1212-1250 / AD 1797-1834, gold 5 toman

Qajar, Nasir al-Din Shah, AH 1264-1313 / AD 1848-1896, silver 5 qiran. Qajar, Nasir al-Din Shah, AH 1264-1313 / AD 1848-1896, silver 5 qiran.
Abbasid, al-Mutawakkil, AH 232-247 / AD 847-861, gold double dinar for presentation (8.34g, 28mm). Abbasid, al-Mutawakkil, AH 232-247 / AD 847-861, gold double dinar for presentation (8.34g, 28mm).
Just a few of the highlights of the Sunrise Collection are:

This collection and the rest of the 2013 January 6-7 Ancient & World Coin Signature Auction will open for bidding soon at HA.com/Coins.

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Numismatics on the Screen

Another in a series of personal essays by Bob Korver

Bones, Season 1: "The Man in the Fallout Shelter"

There are a couple of things that I must make clear at the very beginning; Marley was dead… as dead as a door-nail. No, wait, that's a completely different Christmas story… anyway, back to Bones, and the numismatic foundation of this episode from the first televised season.

There are four main reasons I recommend this Holiday episode, which aired December 13, 2005:

1) I love Christmas, and I always shed tears watching this episode. I won't apologize for this — anyone who has been forced by circumstance to spend the Holidays away from their loved ones will understand.

2) Having worked on multiple occasions at the Smithsonian — er, I mean the "Jeffersonian" — I know firsthand what a terrifically cool place it is, at any season. A much better place to get locked in, as opposed to, say, O'Hare Terminal Two. And I mean that very specifically, having actually been locked in the Smithsonian's vaults — but that's still another story for a different time.

3) I read most of Kathy Reichs' series on Forensic Anthropology in another lifetime, when I had spare time for such dark tomfoolery.

4) It is ultimately determined that "Careful Lionel" was murdered by a fence to steal his coin collection, and not by a coin dealer. Now there's something to celebrate during this festive season. This must be distinctly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate.

The storyline — complicated, but essential for understanding my trifling complaints:

On Christmas Eve-Eve 2005, FBI Agent Seeley Booth brings the Jeffersonian staff the remains of an apparent suicide, found in a 1950s bomb shelter. The Caucasian body resists immediate identification — but several personal effects are also recovered. Unfortunately for the Jeffersonian staff, Jack Hodgins is thinking more about getting back to the Holiday party upstairs than about biologics protocols, and he triggers a (possibly fatal) contamination lock-down during the autopsy — mainly because he chose the wrong moment to cherish a sip of eggnog. Who among us hasn't had that happen??? This is major Grinchdom, as the entire team (Bones, Booth, Angela, Zack, Hodgins, and Dr. Goodman) must remain in isolation through Christmas, but good news for the story-teller: this allows them to further investigate both the case and their Holiday beliefs.

But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that "Careful Lionel" was as dead as a door-nail. Several love letters are found in his clothing, as well as two unredeemed airline-tickets to Paris. His effects also include a wedding band, a small empty white sleeve (ca. 1" x 1", that, while perplexing to the Jeffersonian staff, would be immediate obvious to any old-time collector!), and some spare change. Nick-named courtesy of his well-worn but 'Carefully' maintained bespoke clothing (made in the late 1950s), through his clothier's old records Booth identifies the murder victim as Lionel Little. His tailor's book also noted that he was scheduled for a fitting for a wedding shirt on November 8th, 1958 but that he never arrived. The bomb shelter belonged to a deceased fence named Gil Atkins, whom they suspect killed Lionel for his $8,000 coin collection (which they note is worth approximately $64,000 today — today being 2005). Atkins was caught selling some of the coins to unsuspecting coin dealers in several states.

Numismatically, the storyline isn't too far off, except for one near-fatal bit of production carelessness — considering that Lionel was murdered on 'November 8th, 1958' or "in 1959", depending upon your preference in the contradictory script-writing. But that's clearly not the worst of it. In a quick close-up of Lionel's inventory, we see some very rare coins indeed for 1958/59:

Bones
Click to enlarge.

Let's be fair and call it six major mistakes plus a dozen or so minor ones — unless you prefer that the best of the FBI and the Jeffersonian totally missed that Careful Lionel must have been a time traveler before his demise in the late 1950s (although a Tardis key was not found among his effects). Still, it goes to show just how popular the State Quarters program has been in raising the awareness of coin collecting...

The sender of Lionel's love letters, 'signed' with a sketch of a leaf, is identified as a woman named Ivy Gillespie, believed to be African-American. Here the storyline becomes rather PC, but I don't care (this time) — it's well-done. Their research suggests that Ivy was impregnated by 'Not-So-Careful Lionel' in Oklahoma during a time when such interracial relationships were illegal. They also conclude that "Careful Lionel" was killed by the snitch Atkins to steal the valuable coin collection that Lionel was selling to fund their new life in Paris, but that Atkins overlooked the cent and clueful-coin-cozy in Lionel's pocket.

This Season One show introduces us to the problems that Bones has with the Christmas holiday season, due to the painful memories of her parents' disappearance, and her uncertainty over their fate. She is convinced to track down Ivy to convey the news that Lionel had not deserted her, but had been murdered. Ivy visits Bones at the Jeffersonian on Christmas Day, after the Isolation shields have been lifted, accompanied by her granddaughter. Ivy is overwhelmed with the news that Lionel had indeed tried to create a new life for them. Rather unusual Christmas cheer, but it works.

Bones did a decent job explaining the significance of the 1943 bronze cent, although some of the particulars might disturb a careful student. Viewers were informed that:

1) "...over a billion pennies were minted in 1943" (true if you include all three mints — oh, and this being Christmas, forgive her for using "pennies" — it was good enough for Scrooge, after all...)

2) "Only about twelve of them exist today" (which number is closer to 25 if you include all three mints, and wrong for any one mint)

1943 1C Copper Cent XF 40.
1943 1C Copper Cent XF 40.
3) The coin is worth "over $100,000" in 2005 (which is problematic given our lack of grading information — however, it looks at least AU in its brief cameo, although it was more circulated by the time Bones finished handling it! Oh, and "Careful Lionel" treated his rarity better than the '43 Bronze Heritage sold for $32,000 in 1999 which had suffered the ignominy of being tested for authenticity by its owner dripping battery acid on it to search for a steel core under copper plating, and then mesmerized by the 'failure' of his obverse test, proceeded to likewise test the reverse with even more acid. This thought alone should also produce some Holiday tears; you might prefer to examine the two examples Heritage sold in 2010 for more than $200,000 each.)

4) The disappointing news that Lionel's granddaughter cannot attend medical school due to finances is theoretically solved when Bones produces the 1943 bronze cent for her. This is a touching moment, but clearly Bones is unaware of rising tuition costs for a medical degree. Then again, what were those other three cents in Lionel's pocket?

5) Finally, there is a suggestion that "Careful Lionel's" hobby was the cause of high levels of lead and nickel in his bones. In light of the season, I have decided to simply ignore this bit of television science.

So, all in all, it was a great Christmas in D.C. Temperance was better than her word. She was as good a woman, as the good old city knew, or any other good old museum, city, town, or borough, in the good old world. And while we might wish every scriptwriter to be better educated in numismatics, maybe, just maybe, it should be satisfactory that we know how to keep Christmas well. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God Bless Us, Every One!

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Website Tips: Take Charge Of Your Email Preferences

We know that you have your own priority when it comes to receiving email. You don't want to get too many emails — and yet you don't want to miss anything that concerns you.

At Heritage Auctions, you have complete control over which emails we send you. MyProfile allows you to choose which collectible types you wish to hear about. In addition, you also have complete control over which kinds of emails you wish to receive:


  • Bid confirmation notices: These confirm your bid when you become the high bidder on any lot.
  • Outbid notices: These tell you when you have been outbid through Internet bidding.
  • Daily MyBids: These notices give you a daily snapshot of how your current bids are faring in our auctions.
  • Critical Announcements: We send these only in exceptional circumstances, such as when we are forced to extend an auction deadline.
  • Newsletters: We prepare these weekly or monthly, depending on the collectible type. You can turn these on or off by collectible type.
  • Auction Reminders: These will let you know when our weekly or monthly Internet auctions close, and when our bigger Signature auctions open or close. You can turn these on or off by collectible type.
  • Special Announcements: These announcements are targeted to people in your area, or to people we think might be interested in a specific upcoming offering. You can turn these on or off by collectible type.



To make sure that you are receiving all of the emails you want, and only the emails you want, visit MyProfile now!

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This Week's Top Ten

The ten highest priced coins to sell in Heritage Internet auctions in 2012 (so far):

1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS66 NGC.
1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS66 NGC.
  1. 1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS66 NGC. Sold for $60,375.
  2. 1915-S $10 MS65 PCGS. Sold for $43,000.
  3. 1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS65 PCGS. Sold for $40,005.
  4. 1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS65 NGC. Sold for $38,812.50.
  5. 1927-S $20 MS63 NGC. Sold for $37,950.
  6. 1884 $3 PR65 Ultra Cameo NGC. Sold for $33,499.99.
  7. 1914-D $2 1/2 MS65 PCGS Secure. Sold for $30,550.
  8. 1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS63 PCGS. CAC. Sold for $25,850.
  9. 1907 $20 High Relief, Wire Rim MS64 PCGS. Sold for $25,850.
  10. 1850-O $1 MS64 NGC. Sold for $24,675.

Do you have a suggestion for a future top ten list? Send it to us!

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  Announcements

Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!

When you win any lot worth with a hammer price of $1,000 or more (or $2,500 for Art and Natural History lots), you will receive a coupon that entitles you (or your heirs) to re-consign that lot to Heritage at a reduced seller's commission. Selling through Heritage is a convenient and hassle free way to maximize your return (find out why). Maybe you'll need to make room in your collection for something better, perhaps your collecting tastes will change, or maybe it will be your heirs that benefit; but be sure to save the coupon, which could be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars.

  • Coins: 0% Seller's Commission for all items $1K or more.
  • Comics: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for all items between $1K & $10K, and 0% for items $10K and over.
  • All Other Categories: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for everything else over $1K ($2,500 for Art & Natural History).

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  Employment Opportunities

As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:

  • 20th Century Design Specialist: Beverly Hills, New York
  • Asian Art Specialist: Beverly Hills
  • Comics & Comic Art Specialist: New York
  • European Art Specialist: New York
  • European Comic Art Specialist: Dallas, Paris
  • Fine Jewelry Specialist: New York
  • Firearms Specialist: Dallas
  • Modern & Contemporary Art Specialist: Beverly Hills, New York
  • Timepiece Specialist: Beverly Hills, New York
  • Trust & Estates Specialist: New York
  • World Coins Director: Hong Kong
  • World Paper Money Expert: Dallas/Remote

If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:

  • Cataloger — Currency: Dallas
  • Cataloger — Decorative Arts: Dallas
  • Cataloger — Jewelry: Dallas
  • Client Services Representative: Dallas
  • Color & Photography Imaging Specialist: Dallas/Contract
  • Comics Grader: Dallas
  • Consignment Director — Currency: Dallas
  • Desktop Support: Dallas
  • e-Publishing Expert: Dallas
  • Interns: Dallas
  • Network & Systems Administrator: Dallas
  • Operations Assistant — Coins: Dallas
  • Senior Settlements Accountant: Dallas
  • Shipping Associate: Beverly Hills/Part-time
  • WPF Applications Developer: Dallas

If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

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  Around Heritage
Important Jean-Valentin Morel Surtout de Table Leads Silver & Vertu and Decorative Arts Auctions
French Louis XIV-style Ebony, Engraved Brass and Pewter, Tortoiseshell and Gilt Bronze Meuble A Hauteur D'Appui
A re-discovered silver and gilt bronze Surtout de table, fashioned by famed French silversmith Jean-Valentin Morel, is expected to bring $500,000+ to lead our December 5th Silver & Vertu and December 6th Decorative Arts Signature® Auctions. It is just one of nearly 500 lots of refined objects procured nationwide, including a Louis XIV-style ebony cabinet of engraved brass, pewter and tortoiseshell inlay (estimate $150,000+) and an important Lèon Kahn Regence-style kingwood and gilt bronze tall case clock (estimate $80,000+).

Offered December 5, the historically important Surtout de table comes to auction for the first time in nearly 20 years and only the second time since it was crafted in 1851 for the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations in London. Tim Rigdon, Director of Silver and Decorative Arts at Heritage, painstakingly researched the artifact's whereabouts and located it on the West Coast, blackened with time but accompanied by four sets of gilt and silvered bronze seven-light candelabra. The important piece of Decorative Arts history is offered in a nine-piece lot. Read more about Rigdon's expert research on the Surtout de table.

silver and gilt bronze Surtout de table
A Three Piece Henri Picard Et Freres Silvered Bronze Figural Table Garniture
Additional silver lots crossing the block Dec. 5 include a three-piece Henri Picard et Frères silvered bronze figural table garniture, expected to bring $30,000+, a circa 1851-52 monumental Garrard Victorian silver figural centerpiece, depicting a Moorish rider on horse, estimated to sell for $30,000+ and a Vauchez Frères silver gilt, enamel and gem set verge fuse figural desk clock, with two blackamoor figures astride sapphire-encrusted leopards, estimated to bring $20,000+. A seven piece Kurz & Co. silver tea and coffee service and tray, was crafted in Hanau, Germany, circa 1870, is expected to bring $15,000+.
A North German Empire Mahogany Temple-form Triple Roll-top Desk
Highlighting the nearly 300 lots of Decorative Arts offered Dec. 6 is the Louis XIV-style tortoiseshell meuble á hauteur d'appui, attributed to Charles-Guillaume Winckelsten (French, circa 1860-1870) after the work of Andrè-Charles Boulle. The finely executed cabinet is decorated with tortoiseshell ground inlaid with pewter and brass and edged with a contrasting inlaid band against pewter. Its central gilt bronze frame is accented with pawed foliate legs centering a female mask resting on a stepped base with inlaid panels on brass. Bearing a similarity to a pair in the collection of the Louvre, the meuble à hauteur d'appui is expected to bring $150,000+.

Additionally, a magnificent North German Empire mahogany temple-form triple roll-top desk, with hidden drawers and compartments and an architectural interior, is expected to break $80,000+. An important François Linke Louis XVI-style center bowl of violette marble with scrolling gilt bronze acanthus and laurel handles is expected to bring $40,000+. A 17th century German, ebony silver and hard stone mounted case clock, retaining four spiral-twisted ruby glass columns with Corinthian capitals, is expected to bring $30,000+.

More information about Furniture & Decorative Art auctions.

Iconic Film Car, 'Rain Man' 1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible, May Bring Six Figures

The Iconic 1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Car from 'Rain Man.'
One of two iconic 1949 Buick Roadmaster convertible car used in the acclaimed 1988 United Artists film "Rain Man," starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman, and directed by Barry Levinson, is expected to bring more than $80,000+ when it comes across the block at Heritage Auctions on Dec. 14 as part of an Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction.

"This car is a crucial character in the film," said Margaret Barrett, Director of Entertainment & Music Memorabilia at Heritage. "The plot essentially revolves around this beautiful vehicle, making it more than just a piece of screen-used memorabilia. It's the catalyst for the entire movie – a movie for which Hoffman also won an Academy Award®."

The Iconic 1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Car from 'Rain Man.'
Rain Man famously tells the story of Charlie Babbitt, a selfish yuppie of questionable ethics played expertly by Cruise, who learns that his estranged father has died, bequeathing his entire fortune to his other son, Raymond, an autistic savant brilliantly portrayed by Hoffman. All that Cruise's character gets from his father are his prized rosebushes and the car.
The Iconic 1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Car from 'Rain Man.'
"Cruise's Charlie Babbitt is a high-end car salesman and the 1949 Buick figures large in his life as the one car he never got to drive as he was forbidden from it by his father," said Barrett. "Once he and Hoffman connect, they set off on a cross-country adventure in the car, which is in virtually every scene, and the rest is Hollywood history."

The car is a two-door convertible with beige exterior, red leather interior, Straight-8 Fireball 8 cylinders, 320 c.u. inches engine size, 2-speed Dynaflow automatic transmission with a modified rear suspension to hold the extra weight of the camera equipment plus the cameraman when he had to shoot while sitting in the trunk.

"For a true Hollywood collector or film buff," said Barrett, "this is a plum prize – one of the great screen-featured automobiles from the 1980s from one of the best films of the decade."

More information about Entertainment auctions.

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  Heritage Interactive
Opinion Poll

Answer this quick question and see how your opinion compares with your peers.

How often have you received numismatic gifts for the holidays?
       A) Never
       B) Once or twice
       C) A few times
       D) Often
       E) Never, but I give them




Last week's questions:

Which of the following do you think will go up in value most in the next year?
A) Collector coins (11%).
B) Great rarities (22%).
C) Generic gold coins (21%).
D) Generic silver coins (17%).
E) Key date coins (29%).

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  Is It Time To Sell?

You can depend upon FUN 2013 for your best opportunity to sell your U.S. Coins and Currency early next year. Your invitation to participate in Heritage's Official Auctions has deadlines coming soon, so please act quickly.

FUN has proven to be the strongest show of the year, and there is no question about the importance of this premier venue. As FUN's Official Auctioneer, Heritage's lot viewing and auction rooms are located in the heart of the convention action. We capture the purchasing demand of thousands of floor bidders enjoying themselves at the show who must then compete against Heritage's global community of Internet bidders.

Whatever your specialty or the size of your holdings from a single rarity to a lifetime collection, Heritage has auctions to serve your needs. Together we will create a strategy to realize the highest prices possible for your coins and notes. Our upcoming auction events at FUN 2013 will provide unmatched exposure at the most important gathering in numismatics. All that remains is for you to call us today.

2013 January 9-13 US Coin FUN Signature Auction - Orlando
Consignment Deadline: December 3, 2012

David Mayfield
Vice President, Numismatic Auctions
David@HA.com
1-800-US-COINS ext. 1000

Interested in Selling?
What's My Coin Worth?
Consign to a Heritage Auction

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  Current Auctions
Coin Auctions
2012 November 29 - December 2 US Coin Signature Auction - Houston
2012 November 29 - December 2 US Coin Signature Auction - Houston #1177
View Lots

Sunday Internet Coin Auction Sunday Internet Coin Auction #131249
December 2, 2012
View Lots
Tuesday Internet Coin Auction Tuesday Internet Coin Auction #131249
December 4, 2012
View Lots
Thursday Modern Coin Auctions Thursday Modern Coin Auctions #241249
December 6, 2012
View Lots
Weekly World Coin Auction Weekly World Coin Auction #231249
December 6, 2012
View Lots


Currency Auctions
Tuesday Internet Currency Auction Tuesday Internet Currency Auction #141249
December 4, 2012
View Lots

Other Signature Auctions
2012 December 2 Union County College Foundation Auction 2012 December 2 Union County College Foundation Auction #530
View Lots
2012 December 3 Jewelry Signature Auction- Dallas 2012 December 3 Jewelry Signature Auction- Dallas #5122
View Lots
2012 December 4 Handbags & Luxury Accessories Signature Auction- Dallas 2012 December 4 Handbags & Luxury Accessories Signature Auction- Dallas #5123
View Lots
2012 December 5 Silver & Vertu Signature Auction- Dallas 2012 December 5 Silver & Vertu Signature Auction- Dallas #5124
View Lots
2012 December 6 Decorative Art & Design Signature Auction- Dallas 2012 December 6 Decorative Art & Design Signature Auction- Dallas #5125
View Lots
2012 December 7 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills 2012 December 7 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #5115
View Lots
2012 December 8 Civil War & Militaria Auction 2012 December 8 Civil War & Militaria Auction #6083
View Lots
2012 December 9 Arms & Armor Signature Auction 2012 December 9 Arms & Armor Signature Auction #6081
View Lots
2012 December 11-12 Political, Western Legends & Americana Memorabilia Signature Auction - Dallas 2012 December 11-12 Political, Western Legends & Americana Memorabilia Signature Auction - Dallas #6092
View Lots
2012 December 12 'La Dolce Vita - Artworks' Rome Art Program Auction 2012 December 12 "La Dolce Vita - Artworks" Rome Art Program Auction #531
View Lots
2012 December 14 Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction- Dallas 2012 December 14 Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction- Dallas #7064
View Lots
2012 December 17 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefitting St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters 2012 December 17 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefitting St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters #529
View Lots

Other Internet Auctions
Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction #161249
December 2, 2012
View Lots
Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction #151249
December 2, 2012
View Lots
Sunday Internet Comics Auction Sunday Internet Comics Auction #121249
December 2, 2012
View Lots
Weekly Internet Luxury Accessories Auction Weekly Internet Luxury Accessories Auction #251249
December 4, 2012
View Lots
Tuesday Internet Watch and Jewelry Auction Tuesday Internet Watch and Jewelry Auction #171249
December 4, 2012
View Lots
Thursday Vintage Guitar & Musical Instrument Internet Auction Thursday Vintage Guitar & Musical Instrument Internet Auction #181249
December 6, 2012
View Lots
Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auction Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auction #201249
December 6, 2012
View Lots

Auction Schedule | Order a Catalog

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