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In This Issue:
The David & Sharron Akers Collection at FUN
Seldom Seen Selections: 1861 Confederate States of America Cent
Website Tips: Do's and Don'ts For Sending Images To Heritage
This Week's Top Ten
Coin Buyer Wanted - Dallas Office
Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!
Employment Opportunities
Around Heritage Auctions
Instant Quiz
Is It Time To Sell?
Current Auctions
December 7, 2013
Newsletter Archive
Last Issue
The David & Sharron Akers Collection at FUN
1826 $5 MS66 PCGS
1826 $5 MS66 PCGS
It is our distinct pleasure to present The David & Sharron Akers Collection as a part of our offerings in the 2014 January 8 - 12 FUN US Coin Signature Auction, to take place in Orlando.

Few numismatists bridged the academic and commercial sides of the hobby as well as the late David Akers. His six-volume series published between 1975 and 1982, United States Gold Coins: An Analysis of Auction Records, was definitive for a generation and remains influential. His four-decade career as a dealer and auctioneer, first with Paramount International Coin Corporation and later as David W. Akers, Inc., saw many great successes. Most notable of all was the John Jay Pittman Collection, offered in three parts from 1997 to 1999, which benefited from his concise, erudite, and scrupulous cataloging. He received Lifetime Achievement awards from the American Numismatic Association and the Professional Numismatists Guild, which also recognized him with the Robert Friedberg Literary Award and the Abe Kosoff Founders Award. He was one of only two dealers to win all three of PNG's highest honors.

Sharron Akers married David in 1969, during the period between his service in Vietnam as an artillery officer and his coin career, when he was a graduate student and later a collegiate instructor in mathematics. They were together for 43 years until his death and she was an important presence at David W. Akers, Inc. The 23 coins in The David & Sharron Akers Collection showcase his remarkable eye for quality, including multiple MS69-graded gold dollars. Their 1826 BD-2 half eagle, MS66 PCGS, is by far the finest of just three examples known and a major highlight of Platinum Night.

A few of the other highlights of this collection include:

1822 25C 25/50C PR65 PCGS. B-2, R.8 as a proof 1822 25C 25/50C PR65 PCGS. B-2, R.8 as a proof
1831 25C Large Letters PR66 PCGS. B-5, R.7 as a proof 1831 25C Large Letters PR66 PCGS. B-5, R.7 as a proof
The 2014 FUN auction will be open for bidding soon at HA.com/Coins!

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Seldom Seen Selections: 1861 Confederate States of America Cent
1861 Confederate States of America Cent, Original PR63
1861 Confederate States of America Cent, Original PR63
Generations of numismatists have repeated a canon of commonly held beliefs about original Confederate cents, one of which we are excited to be able to offer as a part of our 2014 January 8 - 12 FUN US Coin Signature Auction in Orlando. The maxim still holds true that once a numismatic fallacy is repeated it becomes fact; after it is repeated again it becomes anabsolute fact. Very little is known as fact about original Confederate cents. What is known is either 12 or 16 pieces were struck in early 1861. Robert Lovett, Jr. was the engraver responsible. The first appearance at auction was in January 1874. Beyond that, just about everything is open to conjecture.

Much of the uncertainty about the original Confederate cents stems from an address made by John Haseltine at the 1908 ANA Convention. By 1908, Haseltine was "one who belongs to the old school of numismatics," as Henry Chapman considered him. His address introduced several previously unmentioned "facts" about the discovery of the Confederate cents. These so-called facts were listed and debunked in Harold Levi and George Corell's book The Lovett Cent, a Confederate Story. They have long been an integral part of the CSA cent story. They include:

"First, Robert Lovett, Jr. spent the discovery coin in a West Philadelphia bar. Second, Haseltine purchased the discovery cent from the bartender. Third, the order for the Confederate cent dies had come through Bailey & Company. Fourth, Lovett buried the cents, and presumably the dies, in his cellar. Fifth, one day Lovett opened a drawer of a cabinet and Haseltine saw a little line of Confederate cents."

Undoubtedly, as the recipient of a honorary life membership in the American Numismatic Association, Captain Haseltine wanted to spin a fine story about the Confederate cents for his audience, but the truth was just as interesting as the stories he created. The story about one of Lovett's pocket pieces surfacing in a Philadelphia bar was not part of the story until Haseltine's address in 1908. The assertion that the dies had come through Bailey & Company seems highly improbable. This also seems like a 1908 afterthought as Robert, Jr.'s brother George had been contacted directly by an agent of the Confederate government to engrave a seal for the Confederacy. Unless Robert was contacted directly by a Confederate agent also, The National Bank Note Company is the most likely link to the Confederacy as they printed the first issue of Confederate notes. A bank note company would have maintained a list of engravers and die sinkers as a service to their clients. As for Haseltine's 1908 assertion that Lovett buried the coins and dies, there is no physical evidence on the known pieces that he did so. Haseltine's assertion that he saw "a little line of Confederate cents" seems highly unlikely. At the time of the appearance of the discovery piece in late 1873, Haseltine was busy preparing two impending auctions, and it was not Haseltine but Dr. Edward Maris who actually purchased the Confederate cents from Lovett (Maris is not mentioned in the 1908 address). Haseltine did purchase the dies and soon began his restriking scheme. He also purchased eight of the original cents from Maris in 1874.

The greatest concentration of truth about the original strikes of the Confederate cents seems to be clustered around the time of their discovery and the sale at auction of the discovery piece. In Haseltine's January 1874 sale, he apparently knew some of the facts, but appears to have not known how many pieces were struck. It appears that Haseltine believed the mintage was limited to the coins he had seen. This fact was later clarified by Dr. Maris, who actually owned the coins.

In Dr. Maris' catalog from 1886, he stated "I believe only about sixteen were ever struck." This number is in line with the number of pieces known today (13), allowing for a loss of three coins over the period of 150+ years.

Some original Confederate cents were struck from perfect dies, but most show a faint die crack along the right side of the wreath on the reverse. Numismatic researcher P. Scott Rubin used this die crack to pose the question: "Why would Lovett deliver a broken die to the Confederacy?" It appears that even though the dies were ordered by the South, they were not delivered to the South.

This example we will be offering at FUN shows no trace of die cracking along the right side of the leaves on the right side of the wreath, indicating this was one of the first, if not the first of these historic coins struck. A curious feature is noted in that area, though: Pronounced mechanical doubling is seen along the leaves on the right side of the wreath. The strike details show slight softness over the high points of the design on each side. However, the L (for Lovett) is especially strong, as seen on all original Confederate cents. Restrikes have significantly softer definition, presumably because of reduced striking pressure used by Haseltine because of the cracked reverse die. Another notable difference between originals and restrikes is that originals were all struck with a medallic turn, while restrikes were produced with a coin turn.

Original Confederate cents have been designated as both business strikes and proofs by PCGS and NGC. Examination of the population data from both services indicates the divided opinion about the nature of the striking of these pieces. PCGS has certified four Mint State pieces, ranging from MS61 to MS64+. At PR63, this is the only proof PCGS has certified. NGC has only graded two originals as business strikes, a pair of MS62 pieces. The other five pieces they have certified have been graded as proofs, and range from PR61 to PR64. (Undoubtedly, there are resubmissions included in these numbers.) In our opinion, this coin is a shallowly mirrored proof that was most likely only struck once. The fields, especially the reverse fields, show evidence of slight die polishing, but not enough to actually give the coin the appearance of a proof, as understood in the traditional sense. The surfaces display the tan-golden color expected from a copper-nickel cent of 88% nickel / 12% copper alloy. The reverse shows deeper, reddish-tinted patina. Areas of shallow planchet porosity are seen on each side — mostly around the margin on the obverse, more obviously seen in the lower reverse field below the CE in CENT.

This original Confederate cent has been off the market since 1974. It was bought by the consignor's father, Dr. Dudley Noble, in April 1974 for $14,995. Mr. Noble died at the all-too-early age of 48. His sons saw the significance of the coin and how it would fit into their collections of Civil War memorabilia that included guns, swords, ambrotypes, tintypes, buckles, buttons, and Confederate currency.

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Website Tips: Do's and Don'ts For Sending Images To Heritage
Every day Heritage receives thousands of emails and phone calls from clients all over the world asking us to evaluate their property. Almost always, our first response is: send us a photograph of the item. The old adage "A picture is worth a thousand words" is very true... but only when the "picture" provides useful information. Here's a list of basic do's and don'ts when sending photographs of your property to our specialists for review.

DO send photographs that are in focus and have enough light to see the item being photographed.
If you can't see what it is, then we can't either.

DON'T email photographs larger than 1MB each.
Larger-sized digital photographs are easier to zoom in and see the details, but too many extremely large photographs in one email completely crashes our computer system. Use a zip file if you need to send more than a dozen images. On the other hand...

DON'T email photographs too small.
Digital photographs less than 100KB are so small that we can't see the item well enough to give an opinion on its age, quality, and value.

DO check your images before you click Send.
More often than you would think, we receive someone's personal photographs attached to the email by mistake. It doesn't take but a second to double check that you are sending the correct images. Some of you sure throw some wild parties!

DON'T send photographs with large glares.
Camera flashes and direct sunlight often produce glares in photographs, especially on pieces that are framed with glass or have very shiny surfaces. If your piece is framed, you may have to remove the glass in order to photograph it.

DO send photographs of the entire front and the entire back.
Close-up photographs are great, but don't forget to send us a photograph of the overall front and back of the piece(s). We don't want to miss anything important because it was cropped out of the photograph. Note — it's generally OK to send photographs of only one side of comic books, sportscards, or movie posters.

DO send a detail of the signature and any other markings, if you are inquiring about any kind of artwork or autograph.
Signatures, dates, titles, inscriptions, labels — they are all important and the detail images that you send assist us in determining the best value for your piece.

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This Week's Top Ten
The ten highest valued Sovereigns to sell in Heritage auctions:

South Africa: George V bronze pattern Sovereign 1928-SA. Not listed in KM. Matte PR64 NGC
South Africa: George V bronze pattern Sovereign 1928-SA. Not listed in KM. Matte PR64 NGC
  1. South Africa: George V bronze pattern Sovereign 1928-SA. Not listed in KM. Matte PR64 NGC. Realized $184,000
  2. Canada: George V gold Sovereign 1916-C, KM20, MS65 PCGS. Realized $86,250
  3. Great Britain: Henry VIII (1509-47) gold Sovereign ND, S-2267, N-1782, Schneider-570/573 (rev.), Tower Mint London (struck 1537-42), AU50 NGC. Realized $64,625
  4. South Africa: George V gold Sovereign 1923-SA, KM-21, MS66 Prooflike PCGS. Realized $49,937
  5. Great Britain: George IV gold Sovereign 1828, S3801, KM696, Bare Head, MS63 PCGS. Realized $46,000
  6. Canada: George V gold Sovereign 1916C, KM20, MS64 PCGS. Realized $46,000
  7. Australia: George V gold Sovereign 1921M, KM29, MS62 NGC. Realized $34,500
  8. Canada: George V gold Sovereign 1916C, KM20, MS63 PCGS. Realized $34,500
  9. Great Britain: Victoria Pattern gold Sovereign 1837, WR-295, Rarity-5 (6 to 10 known), PR63 Ultra Cameo NGC. Realized $32,200
  10. Canada: Edward VII gold Specimen Sovereign 1909-C, KM14, Specimen 65 PCGS. Realized $30,550
Do you have a suggestion for a future top ten list? Send it to us!

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Announcements
Coin Buyer Wanted - Dallas Office

Heritage Auctions is seeking talented numismatists with a broad range of expertise to join our Dallas office. If you have a good working knowledge base of U S. coins and currency and are comfortable dealing with the public, we have openings for permanent positions as a buyer. Duties will include dealing with walk-in clients, evaluating and purchasing coins and currency, working local coin shows, and accepting Auction consignments. Pay will be commensurate with numismatic experience.

If you are interested in this position, please contact Jobs@HA.com.

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Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!

When you win any lot worth with a hammer price of $1,000 or more (or $2,500 for Art and Nature & Science lots), you will receive a coupon that entitles you (or your heirs) to re-consign that lot to Heritage at a reduced seller's commission. Selling through Heritage is a convenient and hassle free way to maximize your return (find out why). Maybe you'll need to make room in your collection for something better, perhaps your collecting tastes will change, or maybe it will be your heirs that benefit; but be sure to save the coupon, which could be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars.

  • Coins: 0% Seller's Commission for all items $1K or more.
  • Comics: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for all items between $1K & $10K, and 0% for items $10K and over.
  • All Other Categories: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for everything else over $1K ($2,500 for Art & Natural History).
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Employment Opportunities
As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:

  • Asian Art Specialist
  • Automobilia Specialist
  • Coin Buyer
  • Decorative Arts & Design Specialist
  • European Art Specialist
  • Modern & Contemporary Art Specialist: (New York, Beverly Hills)
  • World Coins Director: Hong Kong
If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:
  • Client Data Specialist part-time
  • Client Services Representative
  • Color Imaging Specialist
  • Consignment Coordinator
  • Currency Consignment Director
  • eCommerce Content Specialist
  • e-Publishing Expert
  • Interns
  • Maintenance Assistant
  • Nature & Science Auction Coordinator
  • Shipping Associate
  • Web Marketing Specialist
  • U.S. Coin Cataloger Needed
If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

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Around Heritage Auctions

Diamond Sapphire Platinum Ring May Bring $175,000+

Diamond, Sapphire Platinum Ring
An exquisite Diamond, Sapphire Platinum Ring, its smooth, sweeping lines featuring a cushion-cut diamond weighing 3.86 carats and a cushion-cut sapphire weighing 5.03 carats, is expected to sell for $175,000+ in Heritage Auctions' Dec. 9 Fine Jewelry Signature Auction in Dallas. The auction offers more than 1,800 lots of diamond and gemstone jewelry from several private collections including Farrah Fawcett, Mrs. Walter Matthau and pieces formerly in the collection of Elizabeth Taylor.

"We think collectors will appreciate the large variety of fresh-to-market pieces in this auction," said Jill Burgum, Senior Director of Fine Jewelry at Heritage. "From coast to coast, our staff has worked with several important collectors and estates to cultivate an irresistible selection."

Burma Sapphire, Diamond Platinum Ring
A selection of high carat diamonds and gemstones is led by a 36.22 carat Burma Sapphire, Diamond Platinum Ring, enhanced by full-cut diamonds weighing an total of approximately 2.70 carats, is expected to sell for $300,000+. A Diamond, Gold Necklace, featuring a round brilliant-cut diamond weighing 22.11 carats, is expected to hammer for $175,000+. A Fancy Intense Yellow Diamond, Diamond, Platinum Gold Ring, set with a cushion-shaped diamond weighing 10.01 carats, is offered with a $150,000+ estimate, and a Burma Ruby, Diamond Platinum Ring, featuring an oval-shaped ruby weighing 5.76 carats and enhanced by a marquise-shaped diamonds weighing a total of approximately 1.60 carats, is expected to cross the block for $125,000+.

Diamond, Platinum Necklace
A romantic Diamond, Platinum Necklace weighing a total of approximately 66.25 carats and decorated with delicate icicles of diamonds giving way into lively, full-cut diamonds as designed by Fred Leighton, is expected to sell for $120,000+.

Leading the auction's numerous private collections is a selection of 40 pieces of jewelry from the personal property of actress Farrah Fawcett, including a Diamond, Platinum Ring, with a 10.95 carat marquise-cut diamond, which is expected to sell for $100,000+, a Diamond, Platinum Bracelet, featuring square-cut diamonds weighing a total of approximately 11 carats, which is expected to bring $10,000+, and a set of three Diamond, Gold Bracelets, expected to sell for $5,000+. Likely to generate significant collector interest is Fawcett's Diamond, White Gold 'Faucet' Pendant, upon which she based her line of designer costume jewelry. The iconic, personally-owned pendant is conservatively estimated to bring $2,000+.

Black Opal Necklace
A rare and unusual Black Opal Necklace by Tiffany & Co., circa 1900, appears at auction from the estate of Charlotte Bishop Williams Kip (1864-1926), a portrait of whom is included in the lot. Kip and her husband, Frederick Ellsworth Kipp (1862-1938), made their fortune in the textile business. They built an exquisite, turn-of-the-century mansion in Montclair, N.J., popularly referred to as Kypsburg, or Kip's Castle, which is now owned by Essex County. Mrs. Kipp's necklace, a delicately crafted masterpiece featuring an oval-shaped black opal cabochon and framed by round-cut blue and yellow sapphires, is estimated to bring $30,000+.

Additional luxury designer pieces include works by Bvlgari, including a classic Diamond, Emerald Platinum Ring, enhanced with a 2.53 carat European-cut diamond and a 2.49 carat round-cut emerald, estimated to bring $30,000+.

More information about fine jewelry auctions.

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December 19 Heritage Charity Holiday Auction

December 19 Heritage Charity Holiday AuctionCharity Auctions allows nonprofits and their supporters to raise money, goodwill and awareness for their cause. Bid to support their mission and make a difference during the holiday season!

The December 19 Heritage Charity Holiday Auction is now open for bidding and closes December 19, 2013 10:00 PM CT.

For further information, contact Jeri Carroll, JeriC@HA.com or 214-409-1873.

Click here to view the lots »

More information about Charity auctions.

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Instant Quiz
Trivia

1. What was the final year that Walking Liberty half dollars were minted?
       A) 1930
       B) 1940
       C) 1945
       D) 1947
       E) 1948


2. Who was the designer of the Kennedy half dollar?
       A) Elizabeth Jones
       B) Felix Schlag
       C) Frank Gasparro
       D) Gilroy Roberts and Frank Gasparro
       E) John R. Sinnock



Last week's question:

1. Which US coin has a recorded mintage of 2?
Correct Answer: C) 1870-S three dollar gold (29%).

2. What was the first year of the capped bust quarter?
Correct Answer: D) 1815 (36%).


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Is it Time to Sell?
Heritage is excited to announce our upcoming New York Signature Auction to be held at our Headquarters in the heart of the world's largest numismatic hub, New York City, from February 3rd-5th. Our proven auction successes in this city, with this November's Signature auction realizing over $11 million, combined with the highly acclaimed Eric P. Newman Collection which realized over $23 million, show the power of combining a stand out location with quality auctions. We anticipate strong bidder participation during this February's event due to the offering of some of the finest rarities, which are fresh to the market.

Take advantage of consigning to this auction where your coins will stand out amongst the crowd. The December 20th consignment deadline for US coins is approaching. Call our Consignment Hotline at 1-800-872-6467 x1000 today!

2014 February 3 - 5 US Coins Signature Auction - New York
Consignment Deadline: December 20, 2013

David Mayfield
Vice President, Numismatic Auctions
David@HA.com
1-800-US-COINS ext. 1000

Interested in Selling?
What's My Coin Worth?
Consign to a Heritage Auction

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Current Auctions
Coin Auctions
December 5 - 8 US Coins Signature Auction - Houston #1192
December 5 - 8 US Coins Signature Auction - Houston #1192
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Sunday Internet Coin Auction Sunday Internet Coin Auction #131350
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Tuesday Internet Coin Auction Tuesday Internet Coin Auction #131350
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Weekly World Coin Auction Weekly World and Ancient Coin Auction #231350
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Currency Auctions
Tuesday Internet Currency Auction Tuesday Internet Currency Auction #141350
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Signature Auctions
December 6 - 7 Golf Collectibles Catalog Auction featuring The Sam Snead Collection - Dallas #7090 December 6 - 7 Golf Collectibles Catalog Auction featuring The Sam Snead Collection - Dallas #7090
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December 7 Civil War & Militaria Signature Auction - Dallas #6107 December 7 Civil War & Militaria Signature Auction - Dallas #6107
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December 8 Arms & Armor Signature Auction - Dallas #6105 December 8 Arms & Armor Signature Auction - Dallas #6105
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December 9 Fine Jewelry Signature Auction - Dallas #5150 December 9 Fine Jewelry Signature Auction - Dallas #5150
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December 10 - 11 Holiday Luxury Signature Auction - Dallas #5151 December 10 - 11 Holiday Luxury Signature Auction - Dallas #5151
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December 6 Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction - Dallas #7082 December 6 Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction - Dallas #7082
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Note: The date for this auction has been changed to Thursday December 12. Session times will remain the same.
December 13 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #5163 December 13 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #5163
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December 19 Heritage Charity Holiday Auction #557 December 19 Heritage Charity Holiday Auction #557
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December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantires & Shelters #558 December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantires & Shelters #558
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Other Internet Auctions
Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction #151349
Closes December 8
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Sunday Internet Comics Auction Sunday Internet Comics Auction #121349
Closes December 8
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Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction #161349
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Weekly Internet Luxury Accessory Auction Weekly Internet Luxury Accessory Auction #251350
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Tuesday Internet Watch & Jewelry Auction Tuesday Internet Watch & Jewelry Auction #171350
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Monthly Internet Wine Auction Monthly Internet Wine Auction #221350
Closes December 12
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