Heritage Auctions
 The World's Largest Collectibles Auctioneer
MyHeritage
SELL DEPARTMENTS SERVICES RESOURCES
Coin News
In This Issue:
Trio Of Famous U.S. Numismatic Rarities Anchor January 8-12 FUN Offerings
$500 1882 Gold Certificate May Bring $2 Million At FUN Currency Signature Auction
Seldom Seen Selections: The Finest Certified Brasher Doubloon
This Week's Top Ten
Coin Buyer Wanted - Dallas Office
Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!
Employment Opportunities
Around Heritage Auctions
Instant Quiz
Is It Time To Sell?
Current Auctions
December 21, 2013
Newsletter Archive
Last Issue
Trio Of Famous U.S. Numismatic Rarities Anchor January 8-12 FUN Offerings
1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC
1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC
An astounding trinity of legendary American numismatic rarities — a 1787 Brasher doubloon with hallmark EB on the eagle's wing, MS63 NGC, CAC, a 1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC, the Olsen Specimen and a 1927-D double eagle, MS66 NGC — expected to bring millions of dollars when they cross the auction block as part of Heritage's January 8-12 Florida United Numismatists (FUN) U.S. Coin Signature Auction Platinum Night offerings, have the world of high-end coin collecting abuzz.

"The sheer variety in this Platinum Night is amazing," said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage. "The Brasher, the 1913 Liberty nickel and the 1927-D double eagle are only the tip of the proverbial iceberg here."

The first to sell will be a 1787 Brasher doubloon with hallmark EB on the eagle's wing, MS63 NGC, CAC. This Brasher doubloon was the first one known to numismatists and has been off the market since Walter Perschke purchased it in 1979. The Brasher doubloons, created by New York silversmith Ephraim Brasher, were the first truly American gold coins, struck by a resident of a former British colony for use within the United States. The most famous are those with Brasher's original design, which adapts New York's state coat of arms on one side and the Great Seal of the United States on the other.

Soon after, a 1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC, the Olsen Specimen, will cross the auction block. One of only five 1913 Liberty nickels known, two of which are held by museums, it also is called "The Hawaii Five-O Specimen" after an appearance on a 1973 episode of the television show. It is offered as part of The Greensboro Collection, Part V. Between the fame the 1913 Liberty nickel has among coin collectors and the Olsen Specimen's TV appearance, it is one of the most famous single coins on Earth. It's a numismatic star that will lend instant prestige to its new owner.

1927-D $20 MS66 NGC
1927-D $20 MS66 NGC
A 1927-D double eagle, MS66 NGC, is the crown jewel of The Douglas Martin Collection, a virtually complete set of $20 gold pieces. After Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued an executive order that prohibited almost all ownership of gold coins, the Treasury Department stopped paying out gold and eventually destroyed the coins it had on hand, including almost all the 1927-D double eagles ever struck. Out of 13 examples traced, four are held by museums and unavailable to collectors. The Saint-Gaudens double eagles are among the most beautiful and popular U.S. coins, and owning a 1927-D is a mark of distinction.

Two important silver coins that would headline almost any other auction certainly deserve special mention: an 1870-S Seated dollar, XF40 PCGS, is one of only nine confirmed examples and is a centerpiece of The Usibelli Collection, themed around the year 1870, one of the most challenging in U.S. numismatics, while an 1884 Trade dollar, PR65 PCGS, CAC, is one of only 10 struck under mysterious circumstances. It comes from The Smoke Rise Collection.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

1861 Confederate States of America cent, PR63 PCGS Secure 1861 Confederate States of America cent, PR63 PCGS Secure
1792 half disme, Judd-7 variety, MS65 PCGS 1792 half disme, Judd-7 variety, MS65 PCGS
1879 Coiled Hair Stella in gold, Judd-1638 variety, PR66 Cameo PCGS Secure 1879 Coiled Hair Stella in gold, Judd-1638 variety, PR66 Cameo PCGS Secure
1826 half eagle, BD-2 variety, MS66 PCGS 1826 half eagle, BD-2 variety, MS66 PCGS
1838-O 50C PR64 NGC 1838-O 50C PR64 NGC
  • 1861 Confederate States of America cent, PR63 PCGS Secure: Made by a Philadelphia engraver, Robert Lovett, Jr., who soon had second thoughts about making coins for the Confederacy. From The Noble Family Collection.
  • 1792 half disme, Judd-7 variety, MS65 PCGS: One of the best-preserved examples of the first federally issued silver coins, mentioned in a speech by President George Washington to Congress. From The Klamath Mountain Collection, Part II.
  • 1879 Coiled Hair Stella in gold, Judd-1638 variety, PR66 Cameo PCGS Secure: With the unusual face value of four dollars and one of only 12 specimens definitively traced.
  • 1826 half eagle, BD-2 variety, MS66 PCGS: One of only three examples known for the variety and easily the finest, a landmark offering for early gold coinage specialists. From The David & Sharron Akers Collection.
  • 1827 half eagle, BD-1 variety, MS64 PCGS: A noted rarity struck from a single pair of dies, one of the better-preserved coins out of 17 confirmed examples. From the collection of Donald E. Bently, sold for the benefit of the Bently Foundation.
  • 1838-O 50C PR64 NGC: The 1838-O Reeded Edge half dollar is one of the most mysterious and valuable coins in American numismatics. The 1838-O is believed to be the earliest branch mint proof coin of any denomination and no official record of its mintage exists. Researchers have traced only nine surviving examples in all grades, with one coin impounded in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution, and two others in slightly impaired condition.
This auction is open for bidding now at HA.com/Coins.

Back to Top

$500 1882 Gold Certificate May Bring $2 Million At FUN Currency Signature Auction
The only Fr. 1215d $500 1882 Federal Reserve Gold Certificate known to exist other than a specimen in the public collection at the Smithsonian Institution is expected to bring $2+ million in Heritage Auctions' Florida United Numismatists Currency Signature Auction Jan. 8-10 and Jan. 13 in Orlando, Fla. It comes from the estate of a turn of the century banker and includes three other incredible Gold Certificate rarities. The auction includes some of the rarest notes in private hands, including the precious Fr. 379b $1,000 1890 Treasure Note, popularly referred to as the Small Seal Grand Watermelon note, which is also expected to change hands for $2+ million.

Fr. 1215d $500 1882 Gold Certificate PCGS Very Fine 35
Fr. 379b $1000 1890 Treasury Note PCGS Extremely Fine 40
"I can speak for our staff when I say that preparing the January FUN auction has been a true career highlight," said Dustin Johnston, Director of Currency Auctions at Heritage. "Just when we think we've seen it all, we turn up new notes. This auction surprised us with items that we assumed would never turn up in our lifetime or in the future. The odds of survival made their discovery highly unlikely."

The 2014 FUN auction comes nine months after a Heritage set a world record for a U.S. banknote as a $1,000 1891 Treasury Note brought a record $2.58+ million in April in Schaumburg, Ill. This year's event kicks off with a 200-lot Platinum Night Auction presenting some of the world's rarest notes, including a Fr. 1218d $1,000 1882 Gold Certificate. Referred to as a Large Brown Spiked Seal note, the specimen is one of four known, with two in private hands. Prior to the discovery, only three examples were known to exist and as such the rare note has been estimated to sell for $1+ million.

Fr. 1218d $1000 1882 Gold Certificate PCGS Very Fine 35
A second 1882 Gold Certificate, a Fr. 1218e $1,000 note, is one of four known and likely unique in private hands. The appearance of the note raises the census from three to four with two of the three previously known notes residing in the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and in the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. The piece offers bright white paper and fresh ink colors on both sides, which has set its pre-auction estimate at $1+ million.

Fr. 1218e $1000 1882 Gold Certificate PCGS Apparent Very Fine 35
A stunning Fr. 1202a $100 1882 Gold Certificate is a unique discovery and likely the only one of its kind in collectors' hands. The unique, small brown seal, triple signature $100 has the appearance, color, and eye appeal of a high end extra fine note and as such is expected to sell for $700,000+.

Fr. 1202a $100 1882 Gold Certificate PCGS Apparent Very Fine 35
A unique Fr. 11a $20 1861 Demand Note dates to a period when such notes were hand-signed by Treasury clerks. Clerks once added the words "for the" following their signatures and finds such as these are scarce additions to Demand Note collections. The 'irreplaceable' note is estimated to sell for $600,000+.

Fr. 11a $20 1861 Demand Note PMG Choice Fine 15 Net
Among the most highly anticipated lots is a Fr. 377 $100 1890 Treasury Note, popularly referred to as a "Baby Watermelon Note." This coveted specimen is one of just 35 examples known to exist with a great majority of examples in much lower condition and is expected to break $250,000+.

Fr. 377 $100 1890 Treasury Note PCGS Extremely Fine 45
Platinum night is not limited to epic Large Size rarities. One of the most fascinating pieces we're featuring is a Solid Serial Number Zero $1 Federal Reserve Note. The note tells a story of how these pieces were numbered at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, but in this case, it may be the only known example to feature the solid zero serial number to appear at auction. The $60,000 to $90,000 estimate is simply an educated guess. We also expect some enthusiastic bidding for a new to the census and wholly original 1934 Dallas $5000 which is estimated at $80,000 to $100,000.

Fr. 2221-K $5,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PCGS Choice About New 58PPQ
Spectacular National Bank Note discoveries are also a part of this incredible event. The rarities span rare locales across the United States from Zillah, Washington to Key West, Florida. A Series 1902 note from South San Francisco turned up. It's the first time California collectors have seen a note from this locale, one of the last highly coveted and previously unknown locations from the state. It carries a pre-auction estimate of $25,000-$35,000. From Mississippi, a Serial Number 1 Red Seal from Clarksdale is another unlikely survivor from a previously unknown bank. To date, just one other Serial Number Red Seal has been offered at auction from the state, making it a rarity that will appeal to more than just Mississippi collectors. It would not be a surprise to see a realization above its $30,000-$50,000 estimate range.

Key West, FL - $10 1902 Date Back Fr. 617 The Island City NB Ch. # (S)7942 PMG Choice Fine 15 Net
Back to Top

Seldom Seen Selections: The Finest Certified Brasher Doubloon
1787 DBLN Brasher Doubloon, EB on Wing, W-5840, MS63 NGC. CAC
1787 DBLN Brasher Doubloon, EB on Wing, W-5840, MS63 NGC. CAC
Among the great rarities of American numismatics, the 1787 New York Brasher doubloon is in a class of its own. It has been acknowledged as the most important and valuable coin in the world by such luminaries as Henry Chapman and Q. David Bowers. When Fort Worth coin dealer B. Max Mehl offered the present coin in his James Ten Eyck catalog in 1922 he noted, "For historical interest and numismatic rarity, this great coin is second to none. It is rightfully recognized as one of the greatest numismatic rarities of the world." Heritage Auctions is privileged to offer the finest-certified example of this iconic numismatic treasure in the January 2014 FUN auction.

The Brasher doubloon has been called the most valuable coin in the world on many occasions, and its record of prices realized at auction and private sale does much to confirm this claim. The rare coin market rises and falls over time, and some other rare issues that are offered more frequently have occasionally eclipsed the prices realized by the Brasher doubloon in its rare auction appearances, but in head-to-head competition, the Brasher always comes out on top. When Henry Chapman sold the fabled collection of Mathew Adams Stickney in 1907, the Stickney doubloon far outdistanced one of the finest and most famous examples of the 1804 dollar offered in that same sale, realizing $6,200 (a world record for any coin at the time) to $3,600 for the dollar. The coin offered here also easily bested the 1804 dollar in the Ten Eyck sale. Even the redoubtable 1822 half eagle and the unique 1870-S three dollar gold piece in the Eliasberg Collection had to settle for a second-place tie behind the Stickney-Garrett specimen of the Brasher doubloon when those great collections were sold in close proximity in the late 1970s-early 1980s. The recent private sale of the AU50 Bushnell Brasher doubloon for nearly $7.4 million suggests that this finest-certified MS63 example is poised to reclaim its title of "World's Most Valuable Coin."

Various theories have attempted to explain the purpose of the New York Style Brasher doubloons. Some numismatists have suggested that they were struck from the dies intended for Brasher and Bailey's proposed copper coinage, as patterns to show the design to good advantage. Don Taxay carried this theory further, saying that the gold patterns were intended as bribes for the New York State legislators who would favor Brasher and Bailey with a contract for the copper coinage. Although the doubloons approximated the size of the planchets used on the state coppers, they were also roughly the same size as the Spanish doubloons in circulation at that time, so the size argument seems inconclusive. Furthermore, the cost of producing at least seven gold patterns for a copper issue would have been exorbitant. The intricate design of the doubloons, so different from the simple copper pieces of the day, also argues against a pattern origin. The complex design would be hard to duplicate, increasing the difficulty of counterfeiting the pieces, a much greater concern for gold issues than for copper.

Another theory suggested that these coins were produced as souvenirs to visitors of Washington, who lived next door to Brasher during his residence in New York. This souvenir theory suggests that the EB hallmark was famous and treasured. Today, we consider the hallmark to be famous and treasured as suggested. However, in the late 1700s, the hallmark was probably not all that famous. Although a number of gold coins had been stamped with the EB hallmark, it is doubtful that their continued circulation had reached enough people to make the hallmark famous. Because the doubloons contained about $16 worth of gold, they would have been an expensive souvenir of a late 18th century visit. Few visitors could have afforded one.

The third theory advanced to explain the doubloons is that they were intended as a circulating medium of exchange, useful in large transactions between merchants and banks. In support of the theory that these coins were, in fact, intended to represent a gold coinage issue is the weight and gold content, which is within the tolerance for the Spanish doubloons in circulation at the time.

The present coin is not only the finest-certified Brasher doubloon, graded MS63 by NGC, it is also the discovery coin for the issue. By the 1830s, two decades after his death, Brasher's historic gold coinage had faded from public memory and examples of the doubloon were seldom encountered in everyday transactions. The declining price of silver versus gold caused almost all early American gold coins to be hoarded and melted in the period after 1820, and it is possible that some of Brasher's doubloons, both Lima and New York Style pieces, perished in these frequent assays.

The Brasher doubloons as struck coins are an odd mix of artistic skill and lapses in coining practice. The highest-grade examples, including this one, show the effect most clearly. An engraver's "guide line" encircles the obverse, underlining the date and topping the lettering. Raised die polish lines are strong on both obverse and reverse. The edges are smooth and the rims irregular. Striking pressure was uneven, leaving the tops of certain letters and the highest design elements weak, the latter effect particularly visible on the reverse where the sun and mountain are merged.

The surfaces of this coin remain immensely lustrous with rich yellow-gold color. Some letters show doubling similar to the so-called "Longacre doubling" on selected 19th century U.S. coinage, a feature credited in the past to multiple strikings. The punch on the left (facing) wing is clear with a corresponding area of flatness on the opposite side. The coin's abrasions are mostly scattered and well-hidden, though a rim nick to the northwest of the P in PLURIBUS is more obvious and this example's most prominent pedigree marker. Overall eye appeal is tremendous for an 18th century issue and collector interest could not be higher. The coin collecting fraternity is now bracing for a possible new world record when this finest-certified specimen, the original discovery coin, is offered for the first time in nearly 35 years.

Back to Top

This Week's Top Ten
1796 25C MS67+ * NGC. CAC. B-2
1796 25C MS67+ * NGC. CAC. B-2
The eleven highest valued quarters to sell in Heritage auctions:

  1. 1796 25C MS67+ NGC. CAC. B-2. Realized $1,527,500
  2. 1839 25C No Drapery PR65 NGC. Realized $517,500
  3. 1850 25C PR68 NGC. Realized $460,000
  4. 1807 25C MS66 NGC. CAC. B-2. Realized $411,250
  5. 1839 25C No Drapery PR65 NGC. Realized $411,250
  6. 1805 25C MS66 NGC. B-2. Realized $402,500
  7. 1838 25C No Drapery PR63 PCGS. Realized $381,875
  8. 1818 25C PR67 NGC. CAC. B-8. Realized $381,875
  9. 1828 25C 25/5/50C MS67 NGC. CAC. B-3. Realized $352,500
  10. 1804 25C MS65 NGC. B-1. Realized $345,000
  11. 1841 25C PR66 NGC. Realized $345,000
Do you have a suggestion for a future top ten list? Send it to us!

Back to Top

Announcements
Coin Buyer Wanted - Dallas Office

Heritage Auctions is seeking talented numismatists with a broad range of expertise to join our Dallas office. If you have a good working knowledge base of U S. coins and currency and are comfortable dealing with the public, we have openings for permanent positions as a buyer. Duties will include dealing with walk-in clients, evaluating and purchasing coins and currency, working local coin shows, and accepting Auction consignments. Pay will be commensurate with numismatic experience.

If you are interested in this position, please contact Jobs@HA.com.

Back to Top

Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!

When you win any lot worth with a hammer price of $1,000 or more (or $2,500 for Art and Nature & Science lots), you will receive a coupon that entitles you (or your heirs) to re-consign that lot to Heritage at a reduced seller's commission. Selling through Heritage is a convenient and hassle free way to maximize your return (find out why). Maybe you'll need to make room in your collection for something better, perhaps your collecting tastes will change, or maybe it will be your heirs that benefit; but be sure to save the coupon, which could be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars.

  • Coins: 0% Seller's Commission for all items $1K or more.
  • Comics: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for all items between $1K & $10K, and 0% for items $10K and over.
  • All Other Categories: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for everything else over $1K ($2,500 for Art & Natural History).
Back to Top

Employment Opportunities
As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:

  • Asian Art Specialist
  • Automobilia Specialist
  • Coin Buyer
  • Decorative Arts & Design Specialist
  • European Art Specialist
  • Modern & Contemporary Art Specialist: (New York, Beverly Hills)
  • World Coins Director: Hong Kong
If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:
  • Client Data Specialist part-time
  • Client Services Representative
  • Consignment Coordinator
  • Currency Consignment Director
  • e-Publishing Expert
  • Interns
  • Maintenance Assistant
  • Operations Assistant
  • Web Marketing Specialist
  • U.S. Coin Cataloger Needed
If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

Back to Top

Around Heritage Auctions

Now Bidding: December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters

Art Linkletter: TV Host
Artists, entertainers, athletes, politicians, and business celebrities put their artistic and creative skills to good use by doodling. Proceeds from the December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction allow St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters to give support to a network of charitable programs that provide a broad range of services for those in need, including the provision of food, clothing, shelter, and related social services for the poor.

For further information, contact Jeri Carroll, JeriC@HA.com or 214-409-1873.

More information about charity auctions.

Back to Top

Fine & Decorative Arts is always seeking quality consignments.

A Gorham Silver Repousse Water Pitcher
Contact one of our experts today!

Featured at right:
A Gorham Silver Repoussé Water Pitcher
Gorham Manufacturing Co., Providence, Rhode Island, circa 1887
Sold for $40,625 (June 2013)

More information about fine & decorative art auctions.

Back to Top

Instant Quiz
Trivia

1. Which of the following half dollar types was minted for the longest period of time?
       A) Barber
       B) Franklin
       C) Kennedy
       D) Seated Liberty
       E) Walking Liberty


2. During which years were Special Mint Sets made available to the general public?
       A) 1964-1967
       B) 1965-1967
       C) 1975-1976
       D) 1981-1982
       E) 1982-1998



Last week's question:

1. Which of the following is equal in value to half a dupondius?
Correct Answer: A) As (14%).

2. What was the location of the only US branch mint that was outside the United States?
Correct Answer: C) Manila (64%).


Back to Top

Is it Time to Sell?
The upcoming Atlanta ANA auction to be held February 27th through March 2nd already has standout collections consigned and now is your chance to participate in this stellar auction. Our proven track record of success when partnering with the American Numismatic Association always ensures strong auction results. The January 14th deadline is quickly approaching so act now to ensure your spot in this legendary event. Call our Consignment Hotline at 1-800-872-6467 x1000 today!

2014 February 27 - Mar 2 US Coins Signature Auction - Atlanta
Consignment Deadline: January 14, 2014

David Mayfield
Vice President, Numismatic Auctions
David@HA.com
1-800-US-COINS ext. 1000

Interested in Selling?
What's My Coin Worth?
Consign to a Heritage Auction

Back to Top

Current Auctions
Coin Auctions
January 5 - 6 World & Ancient Coin Signature Auction - New York #3030
January 5 - 6 World & Ancient Coin Signature Auction - New York #3030
View Lots
January 8 - 12 FUN US Coin Signature Auction - Orlando #1201
January 8 - 12 FUN US Coin Signature Auction - Orlando #1201
View Lots
January 8 - 12 FUN US Coin Signature Auction - Orlando #1201
Platinum Night
Part of Auction #1201
January 9th at 5:00 PM CT
View Lots
January 10 The Adam Mervis Large Cent Collection FUN Signature Auction - Orlando #1200
January 10 The Adam Mervis Large Cent Collection FUN Signature Auction - Orlando #1200
View Lots
January 14 - 16 Selections From the Eric P. Newman Collection Part III Signature Auction - New York #3029
January 14 - 16 Selections From the Eric P. Newman Collection Part III Signature Auction - New York #3029
View Lots
January 20 - 21 World and Ancient Coins Non Floor Session Auction - Dallas #3031
January 20 - 21 World and Ancient Coins Non Floor Session Auction - Dallas #3031
View Lots
Sunday Internet Coin Auction Sunday Internet Coin Auction #131352
Closes December 22
View Lots
Tuesday Internet Coin Auction Tuesday Internet Coin Auction #131352
Closes December 24
View Lots
Weekly World Coin Auction Weekly World and Ancient Coin Auction #231352
Closes December 26
View Lots
   
Currency Auctions
January 8 - 10 & 13 FUN US Currency Signature Auction - Orlando January 8 - 10 & 13 FUN US Currency Signature Auction - Orlando #3526
View Lots
January 9 & 13 FUN World Currency Signature Auction - Orlando January 9 & 13 FUN World Currency Signature Auction - Orlando #3523
View Lots
Tuesday Internet Currency Auction Tuesday Internet Currency Auction #141352
Closes December 23
Note: This auction is closing a day earlier due to the holiday
View Lots

 
Signature Auctions
December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters #558 December 27 Doodle for Hunger Celebrity Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries & Shelters #558
View Lots
   
Other Internet Auctions
Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction Sunday Internet Sports Collectibles Auction #151351
Closes December 22
View Lots
Sunday Internet Comics Auction Sunday Internet Comics Auction #121351
Closes December 22
View Lots
Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction #161351
Closes December 22
View Lots
Weekly Internet Luxury Accessory Auction Weekly Internet Luxury Accessory Auction #251352
Closes December 24
View Lots
Tuesday Internet Watch & Jewelry Auction Tuesday Internet Watch & Jewelry Auction #171352
Closes December 24
View Lots
Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auction Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auction #201352
Closes December 26
View Lots
Auction Schedule | Order a Catalog
Back to Top

Departments MyHeritage
SERVICES
Art & Antiques
Books
Coins
Comics
Currency
Domain Names & Intellectual Property
Entertainment & Music
Historical
Jewelry & Timepieces
Luxury Accessories
Movie Posters
Nature & Science
Real Estate
Sports
Stamps
Wine
Charity Auctions
MyBids
MyTrackedLots
MyWantlist
MyProfile
MyCollection
MyConsignments
MyOrders
Free Auction Evaluation
Appraisal Services

Consign Now
Sam Foose
1-800-872-6467 x1227
Facebook Twitter Google LinkedIn YouTube
Heritage Auctions / bid@HA.com / 3500 Maple Ave / Dallas, Texas 75219 / 1-877-HERITAGE (437-4824)
Copyright © 1999-2013 Heritage Capital Corporation / All Rights Reserved