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In This Issue:
Amazing Colonial Coins From The Eric P. Newman Collection
CSNS Platinum Night Realizes Over $29 Million
Seldom Seen Selections: Unique 1783 Nova Constellatio Plain Edge Bit
2014 Cassie McFarland Signature Baseball Hall of Fame Silver Dollars!s
This Week's Top Ten
U.S. Coin Cataloger Wanted
Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!
Employment Opportunities
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April 26, 2014
Newsletter Archive
Last Issue
Amazing Colonial Coins From The Eric P. Newman Collection
Russia: Nicholas II Presentation gold 25 Roubles (2-1/2 Imperials) 1896
Russia: Nicholas II Presentation gold 25 Roubles (2-1/2 Imperials) 1896
Heritage is proud to present our fourth offering of Selections of the Eric P. Newman Collection in a standalone auction May 16-17 at our New York offices and over the Internet at HA.com. As with previous offerings from Mr. Newman's extensive collection, this auction focuses on material in a particular numismatic field. In Part IV, you will find nearly 700 lots of the rarest, high-grade United States Colonials offered in recent memory, again with much of it pedigreed to "Col." E.H.R. Green. The selection gives collectors of all budgets a chance to own part of this long-held collection and an historic artifact from our nation's formative years.

Response to Mr. Newman's collection thus far has made numismatic history. The 2013-2014 offering of Parts I-III of The Eric P. Newman Collection broke new ground with pattern coinage alongside the first Territorial gold coin to sell for more than a million dollars at auction, the United States Assay Office ten dollar piece. Next was the incredible $23 million dollar sale of mostly silver US federal coinage, followed by a fabulous array of World Coins, which surpassed $6 million.

The unsurpassed rarity of this collection is exemplified by the 1776 Continental Dollar, MS63 NGC, struck in silver rather than pewter, the finest of four known, and the finer of only two known of the E.G. FECIT variety; the 1737 Three Pence AU50 NGC, one of the finest of all Higley Coppers; and the 1787 George Clinton Copper, MS63 Brown NGC, as bold as the day it was made. Among several standout early American Colonials, the (1652) New England (NE) Sixpence AU58 NGC, Noe 1-A, the only variety recognized as genuine, is probably the finest known. The 1792 Silver Center Cent, Judd-1, MS63+ Brown NGC, presents a special opportunity to own one of the best examples of this rare proposed pattern issue.

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society Items being sold are from the extensive collection of Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society (a Missouri not-for-profit corporation) and have been assembled over a period of 90 years. Proceeds of the sale of all items will be used exclusively for supplementing the Society's museum operations and scholarly numismatic research efforts and for the benefit of other not-for-profit institutions selected by Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society for public purposes.


Just a few of the many additional highlights of this auction include:

E.G. FECIT variety; the 1737 Three Pence AU50 NGC E.G. FECIT variety; the 1737 Three Pence AU50 NGC
1787 George Clinton Copper, MS63 Brown NGC 1787 George Clinton Copper, MS63 Brown NGC
1792 Silver Center Cent, Judd-1, MS63+ Brown NGC 1792 Silver Center Cent, Judd-1, MS63+ Brown NGC
This auction is open for bidding now at HA.com.

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CSNS Platinum Night Realizes Over $29 Million
Platinum Night at the Heritage Central States auction is complete, with total sales exceeding $29 million. Results were dominated by the outstanding Territorial pieces from The Riverboat Collection, which realized nearly $10.5 million by itself. The Riverboat Collection supplied the top six results, each coming in at over $500,000.

1849 Pacific Company Five Dollar AU58 PCGS 1849 Pacific Company Five Dollar AU58 PCGS
1855 Kellogg & Co. Fifty Dollar PR64 Cameo PCGS. K-4 1855 Kellogg & Co. Fifty Dollar PR64 Cameo PCGS. K-4
Highlights from other collections included:

1854-O $20 AU55 PCGS Secure 1854-O $20 AU55 PCGS Secure
This auction continues through Sunday at HA.com/Coins, and is expected to raise a total exceeding $45 million. All prices realized include Buyer's Premium.

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Seldom Seen Selections: Unique 1783 Nova Constellatio Plain Edge Bit
1783 '100' Unique Plain Edge Nova Constellatio 100 Units, Silver, AU55 NGC
1783 '100' Unique Plain Edge Nova Constellatio 100 Units, Silver, AU55 NGC
To quote Heritage Auctions' Co-Chairman Jim Halperin, "The 1783 Nova Constellatio patterns are, quite simply, national treasures. Not only are they the first pattern coins issued by the newly independent United States, they are also the forerunners of the decimal coinage's acceptance, first in America, then eventually by most monetary systems throughout the world. From a historical perspective, I believe that no more important coinage exists from any country on earth." These coins are of the utmost interest to students of history, economics, and art, as well as coin collectors of all disciplines. Heritage Auctions is privileged to offer the discovery example of the 1783 Nova Constellatio bit, the unique plain edge example from the fabulous Selections from the Eric P. Newman Collection IV, in just its third auction appearance. This coin's last public offering was in 1903, over 100 years ago.

In 1781, the newly independent United States found itself in a nearly untenable financial situation. The country was operating as a loose affiliation of states under the weak central authority of the Articles of Confederation. Each of the original 13 colonies functioned as a separate economic entity and official rates of exchange varied widely from one state to another. To quote Gouverneur Morris:

"The various coins, which have circulated in America, have undergone different changes in their value, so that there is hardly any which can be considered as a general standard, unless it be Spanish dollars. These pass in Georgia at five shillings, in North Carolina and New York at eight shillings, in Virginia and the four Eastern States at six shillings, and in all other states, excepting South Carolina, at seven shillings and sixpence, and in South Carolina at thirty two shillings and sixpence."

To make the situation even worse, the money supply of the new country consisted of a confusing mix of Spanish, French, and English coins and an equally varied mix of paper money issued by various banks and government entities. Interstate commerce required a bewildering number of financial calculations that were quite challenging for the parties involved and often resulted in suspicion and mistrust on all sides. It was clear to everyone in government and business circles that a unified monetary system was needed for the infant economy to grow.

Acting on the instructions of Superintendent of Finance Robert Morris, Gouverneur Morris (no relation), Assistant Superintendent of Finance for the Confederation of American States, conceived the Nova Constellatio patterns in 1781 as representatives of the first proposed monetary system for the newly independent country. As Walter Breen said, it was "at once the most ingenious and the most cumbersome coinage system ever devised in Western Civilization." Morris discovered that 1,440 was a significant number for the majority of monetary systems in use throughout the country.

By making his basic unit, or mill, equal to 1/4 of a grain of silver, or 1/1,440th of a Spanish milled dollar, Morris could express prices for any item in terms of the monetary units currently employed by 12 of the 13 states in a corresponding number of federal units without resorting to fractions. Ten federal units would equal one penny in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland; 15 units would equal one penny in Georgia; 24 units would equal one penny in New York and North Carolina; and 32 units would equal one penny in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Virginia. Only South Carolina remained unreconciled, where slightly more than 3.6973 units would equal one penny. Morris determined that 48 units would equal 13 pence in South Carolina, close enough for business purposes.

Accordingly, Morris decided to make his basic monetary unit, the mill, equivalent to 1/1,440th of a Spanish milled dollar. Of course, a coin that contained only 1/4 grain of silver would be much too small for practical use, so Morris kept the unit, or mill, as an abstract concept. The smallest coin actually envisioned in his system was a copper five-unit piece; other denominations included an eight-unit copper coin, a 100-unit silver piece (known as the cent or bit), a 500-unit silver quint, a 1,000-unit silver mark, and, eventually, a 10,000-unit gold piece.

The dies for the mark were produced from device punches in the usual manner of the time, while the dies for the quint and the bit were cut by hand. Seven examples of the Nova Constellatio patterns survive today: one mark, one Type One quint, one Type Two quint, three 100-unit cents, or bits, one of which (the present coin) has a plain edge, and a single copper five-unit piece. No specimens of the proposed gold 10,000-unit piece or the copper eight have ever been found, and it seems unlikely that any were ever struck. Of the seven surviving coins, six of them exhibit the same devices:

Obverse: The All-Seeing Eye in a glory of rays at the center with 13 stars and NOVA CONSTELLATIO around.
Reverse: U.S (no stop after S) and denomination enclosed by an olive wreath at the center with LIBERTAS JUSTITIA and the date 1783 around.
Edge: Twin olive leaf design, except for the copper five and one of the bits, which have plain edges.

The Type Two quint features the same reverse as the Type One, but the obverse is unique with the all-seeing eye encircled by 13 stars and no inscription.

The Nova Constellatio coinage system was likewise never adopted. The proposed monetary system met with considerable opposition from Thomas Jefferson when he entered Congress in 1783. As Jefferson wrote in 1784:

"The general views of the financier were sound, and the principle was ingenious on which he proposed to found his Unit. But it was too minute for practical use, too laborious for computation either by the head or in figures. The price of a loaf of bread 1/20 of a dollar would be 72. Units; a pound of butter 1/5 of a dollar 288. Units; a horse or bullock of 80. D. value would require a notation of 6 figures, to wit 115,200 and the public debt, suppose of 80. millions, would require 12 figures, to wit 115,200,000,000. Such a system of money-arithmetic would be entirely unmanageable for the common purpose of society."


Jefferson's objections were eminently practical and hard to refute. Robert Morris made a final attempt to convince him that the proposed monetary system should be adopted, reasoning that it would result in less disruption of the various monetary systems in use throughout the states than any other suggested plan. Jefferson remained adamant that it was better for the national economy to endure the temporary inconvenience of learning a new universal system than to settle for an impractical, but familiar system, which would complicate financial dealings far into the future.

Surprisingly, the discovery of the 1783 Nova Constellatio bit took place, not in this country, but in Scotland, when the Edinburgh firm of T. Chapman & Son offered the present coin in lot 131 of the collection of William Taap, and others, beginning on October 21, 1884. The lot realized 15 pounds, 15 shillings ($78.75) to Scottish collector John G. Murdoch or, more likely, a dealer representing him at the sale. After John G. Murdoch died in 1902, his massive collection was offered by Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge in a series of eight auctions held in 1903 and 1904, where the lot was purchased by S.H. Chapman, for 26 pounds ($126.66). The Chapman brothers later sold the bit to Robert Garrett, youngest son of T. Harrison Garrett, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad magnate. The elder Garrett had assembled one of the greatest numismatic collections of the 19th century before his untimely death in 1888. Robert inherited his father's collection and took pains to preserve it, but lacked interest in buying coins; the bit was one of the few major additions he made during his long stewardship. He either sold or traded the collection to his older brother, John Work Garrett, in 1919.

Unlike his brother, John Work Garrett was an avid collector and he steadily built the collection over the years, until his death in 1942. He entered into partnership with New York coin dealer Wayte Raymond in 1923 to buy the marvelous collection of Colonel James W. Ellsworth, through Knoedler Galleries. The asking price for the collection was $100,000, the largest numismatic purchase on record up to that time. Garrett and Raymond split the collection between them, with Raymond keeping most of the federal issues and Garrett retaining the Territorial and colonial coins, including a complete set of the Nova Constellatio silver patterns. Garrett then had two examples of the bit in his collection. Evidently not realizing that the edge designs were different (plain verses leaf design), or not considering the difference important, Garrett sold the plain edge piece through Wayte Raymond for $2,200 shortly after their deal for the Ellsworth Collection was completed. Raymond apparently sold the plain edge bit to the Guttag brothers, New York coin dealers, who offered it at an undisclosed fixed price in a circular dated May 2, 1923. The coin was purchased by Baltimore financier Waldo Newcomer, who held it until 1931.

The plain edge bit passed to eccentric millionaire "Colonel" Edward Howland Robinson Green when Newcomer sold his front line collection through Fort Worth coin dealer B. Max Mehl. Green kept the coin in his fabulous collection until his death in 1936, when it passed to his estate. The numismatic collection was stored and curated by the Chase-Manhattan Bank. Green's collection remained intact until Eric P. Newman established a rapport with the administrators of his estate and succeeded in buying some Missouri currency he was studying in the early 1940s. After this initial foray, Newman partnered with his mentor, St. Louis coin dealer Burdette G. Johnson, to acquire many more items from Green's collection. Johnson's financial resources allowed him to purchase many items, including the plain edge bit, on his own account, and Newman purchased the coins he wanted from Johnson afterward, as soon as he could afford to buy them. Most of Newman's purchases were made at bargain prices, but he paid a substantial $1,500 for the unique plain edge bit. The coin has remained a centerpiece of his celebrated collection for more than 70 years.

The Eric P. Newman bit is a well-preserved Choice AU piece, with sharply defined design elements that show just a trace of friction on the high points. The lettering, stars, and dentils all show evidence of multiple strikes. We believe this coin received at least three blows from the screw press. At least one of the leaf-edge bits shows evidence of multiple strikings as well, consistent with the idea that these coins were struck as proofs, as suggested by Walter Breen and PCGS. The surfaces display pleasing shades of silver-gray, pale green, and amber toning. The planchet is well-formed and there is no sign of die rust or corrosion. A few minor abrasions are scattered over the surfaces of both sides and, although reflectivity is minimal, traces of prooflike luster show when the coin is tilted in the light. Some faint planchet adjustment marks are seen on the plain edge. A metallurgical analysis of the coin reveals the following composition: 93.65% silver, 6.19% copper, 0.16% trace elements, total weight: 26.39 grams.

As arguably the first official United States coins, the Nova Constellatio patterns are among the most interesting and historically significant coins in the world. They are even more important as an early example of a decimal coinage system, a precursor of the systems that have been almost universally adopted by Western countries today. These coins are greatly sought after by pattern enthusiasts, colonial and early U.S. collectors, and aficionados of art and history. This coin is a unique example of the 100-unit bit, the only one of the three known examples to feature a plain edge. It is remarkably well preserved for a coin of this era, and it has been off the market for more than 70 years. This is only the third public offering of this piece in its 231-year history, making this lot a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the discerning collector.

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society Items being sold are from the extensive collection of Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society (a Missouri not-for-profit corporation) and have been assembled over a period of 90 years. Proceeds of the sale of all items will be used exclusively for supplementing the Society's museum operations and scholarly numismatic research efforts and for the benefit of other not-for-profit institutions selected by Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society for public purposes.


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2014 Cassie McFarland Signature Baseball Hall of Fame Silver Dollars!
Cassie McFarland

California native Cassie McFarland was the winning designer in a contest that would decide the design of the first concave coin produced by the United States Mint. Competing against 15 other finalists, Cassie's innovative design modeled after her own baseball mitt inevitably won the judges over. A graduate of the California Polytechnic State University, she holds a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts, Studio Art and Design. She currently resides in California where she is a full time figurative painter and photographer.

The 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame coins are a unique endeavor for the United States Mint. Convex on the reverse and concave on the obverse, this is the first coin of its design. Heritage is proud to offer these coins with her exclusive signature on each coin. Only available from Heritage, these coins have all been designated First Strike by PCGS.

PCGS MS 69/70
Cassie McFarland Cassie McFarland


PCGS PR 69/70
Cassie McFarland Cassie McFarland


To order, please contact Mark Ingold, Ryan Cook, Mark Feld, Doug Baliko, Lee Sanders, or trading@HA.com.

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This Week's Top Ten
The eleven Connecticut coppers that have sold for the highest prices in Heritage auctions:

1785 Connecticut Copper, African Head VF30 NGC. M. 4.2-F.6
1785 Connecticut Copper, African Head VF30 NGC. M. 4.2-F.6
  1. 1785 Connecticut Copper, African Head VF30 NGC. M. 4.2-F.6. Realized $115,000.
  2. 1786 Connecticut Copper, Hercules Head AU50 PCGS. M. 5.3-B.2. Realized $86,250.
  3. 1788 Connecticut Copper, Mailed Bust Right MS62 Brown PCGS. M. 2-D. Realized $19,550.
  4. 1787 Connecticut Copper, Draped Bust Left Good 4 Details ANACS. M. 33.42-Z.2. Realized $10,925.
  5. 1787 Connecticut Copper, Small Head Right, ETLIB INDE AU58 PCGS. M. 1.1-A. Realized $10,925.
  6. 1786 Connecticut Copper, Mailed Bust Left VF20 ANACS. M. 5.4-N. Realized $10,350.
  7. 1788 Connecticut Copper AU55 PCGS. Draped Bust Left. Breen-873. Realized $10,350.
  8. 1787 INDE ET LIB Small Bust Right Connecticut Copper Good Details NGC. M. 1.1-VV. Realized $9,775.
  9. 1787 Connecticut Copper, Draped Bust Left Fine Details NGC. Miller 33.20-Z.11. Realized $9,775.
  10. 1786 Connecticut Copper, Mailed Bust Left XF45 PCGS.Miller 5.2-H.1. Realized $8,050.
  11. 1787 Connecticut Copper, Draped Bust Left — Counterstamped, Double Struck 10% Off Center — Fine 12 PCGS. M. 33.28-Z.20. Realized $8,050.
Do you have a suggestion for a future top ten list? Send it to us!

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Announcements
U.S. Coin Cataloger Wanted

Heritage Auctions is seeking a talented numismatist with broad expertise in U.S. coins to join our award-winning staff. If you have an extensive knowledge base of U.S. coins and have exceptional writing skills we have an opening as a cataloger. You can work with the most successful team of numismatists in the world. This is a full-time position based in our Dallas headquarters. Duties will include cataloging, evaluating and attribution of U.S. coins, assisting with catalog production, and contributing numismatic articles for newsletters and other publications.

If you are interested, please contact BrittM@HA.com.

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Reduced Auction Commissions When You Resell Your Winnings!

When you win any lot worth with a hammer price of $1,000 or more (or $2,500 for Art and Nature & Science lots), you will receive a coupon that entitles you (or your heirs) to re-consign that lot to Heritage at a reduced seller's commission. Selling through Heritage is a convenient and hassle free way to maximize your return (find out why). Maybe you'll need to make room in your collection for something better, perhaps your collecting tastes will change, or maybe it will be your heirs that benefit; but be sure to save the coupon, which could be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars.

  • Coins: 0% Seller's Commission for all items $1K or more.
  • Comics: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for all items between $1K & $10K, and 0% for items $10K and over.
  • All Other Categories: 50% of the usual Seller's Commission for everything else over $1K ($2,500 for Art & Natural History).
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Employment Opportunities
As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:

  • Asian Art Specialist
  • Coin Buyer
  • Modern & Contemporary Art Specialist: (New York)
  • World Coins Director: Hong Kong


If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:

  • Client Data Specialist part-time
  • Client Services Representative
  • Decorative Arts Cataloger
  • e-Publishing Expert
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  • Interns
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  • U.S. Coin Cataloger Needed
If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

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Around Heritage Auctions
Lunar-landed Artifacts From Moonwalker Alan Bean

Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown and Surface-Used PLSS Strap Directly from the Personal Collection of Mission Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean, Certified and Signed
Selections from the Personal Collection of Apollo era astronaut Alan Bean, the Apollo 12 Mission Lunar Module Pilot, form the centerpiece of Heritage Auctions' May 14 Space Signature Auction. The Collection features Bean's own lunar surface-used Personal Life Support System (PLSS) strap, which he wore for nearly eight hours on the moon in 1969, and still bears traces of moon dust

Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown and Surface-Used Scissors with Lanyard and Snap Directly from the Personal Collection of Mission Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean, with Handwritten LOA
Also offered from Bean's collection are two more key artifacts that were with him on the moon's surface for several hours during his moon walk: his Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown and Surface-Used Scissors with Lanyard and Snap and his Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown and Surface-Used Fisher AG-7 Space Pen.

"All three of these lots are simply stellar exemplars of the rarest, most desirable and most evocative types of Space memorabilia available," said Howard Weinberger, Consultant on Space Exploration memorabilia at Heritage Auctions. "When it comes to collecting this material, pieces that have been on the lunar surface, with an astronaut, are by far the most highly sought after and significant. Most importantly, it absolutely has to come straight from an astronaut, with a full letter of provenance, and this has all of that and more."

The property in Bean's collection to be sold on May 14 has never before appeared at public auction, all of it having resided with him and his family since 1969.

"Beyond the trio of lunar-surface material that tops this auction," said Weinberger, "there are several other very key artifacts being offered that were either in the lunar module on the moon's surface or that flew in the Command Module from the earth to the moon. At every level of this material there is something spectacular and notable in terms of America's lunar program."

Apollo 12 Flown CM to LM Electrical Power Umbilical Cable Directly from the Personal Collection of Mission Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean, with Handwritten LOA
Among the most sought-after pieces will be Bean's Apollo 12 Flown Command Module to Lunar Module Electrical Power "Umbilical" Cable, which was connected while on the way to the moon to supply power to the Lunar Module Intrepid from the Command Module and was disconnected from and stowed aboard the Command Module Yankee Clipper when it was time to undock the Lunar Module and begin descent toward the Ocean of Storms. Another prized lot: an Apollo 12 Flown Stainless Steel Interval Timer, a rare and important piece of equipment used in the command module to and from the moon. Bean used this timer "when (he) stirred the cryogenic tanks, performed urine dumps, and other on-board procedures where accurate time intervals were needed."

"This is a six-minute mechanical timer with a switch that, when in the "X 10" mode, makes it a one-hour timer," said Weinberger. "This is the first such piece that Heritage has offered and an extraordinary piece of space memorabilia."

Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown and Surface-Used Scissors with Lanyard and Snap Directly from the Personal Collection of Mission Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean, with Handwritten LOA
An Apollo 12 Lunar Module Flown Beta Cloth Temporary Stowage Bag, a uniquely-designed Beta cloth storage bag that was used in the lunar module, is also going to be hotly contested in the auction. According to Bean's writing on the bag itself, "This Stowage Bag, Serial Number 0015, was mounted in front of me at waist height and I used it to stow, temporarily, my check lists, food items and other articles I used in our Lunar Module Intrepid during landing, our stay on the lunar surface, and our ascent from the moon."

Bean's personal Apollo 12 Flown Custom-Fitted and molded orange Communications Earpiece, which was attached to the internal communications system on the Command Module is a special lot that figured in many of the most important moments of the mission, and was specially made for extra comfort on the long journey, while an Apollo 12 Flown Mirror, with rounded corners, with a swivel mounting post on the back with printed Part Numbers should prove equally as interesting to collectors. The Apollo 12 Stowage List shows a mirror with this part number as being stowed in the Right Hand Side Storage Compartment of the Lunar Module, both at Earth Launch and Lunar Launch (pages 49 and 75), and possibly flown in the Lunar Module.

More information about Space Exploration auctions.

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Instant Quiz
Trivia

1. Which of the following coins has a face value of exactly one US dollar?
       A) Australian Dollar
       B) Canadian Dollar
       C) Costa Rican Colon
       D) Mexican Peso
       E) Panamanian Balboa


2. Which date Shield nickel is known in With Rays and No Rays variants?
       A) 1866
       B) 1867
       C) 1868
       D) 1882
       E) 1883



Last week's question:

1. Which coin features an image of songwriter Stephen Foster?
Correct Answer: B) Cincinnati half dollar (47%).

2. What was the final year of issue for the nickel three cent piece?
Correct Answer: E) 1889 (33%).


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Is it Time to Sell?
Heritage is dedicated to selling your rare coins and currency for top dollar in the marketplace, providing you with the right auction at the right venue. Your coins can sell alongside thousands of rarities. In recent auctions, Heritage has achieved extraordinary prices realized. Our world-class marketing is second to none. Our more than 850,000 online bidder-members ensure a wide reaching audience for your coins.

We invite your consignment to the Official Summer FUN 2014 Auction. Call one of our Consignment Directors today!

2014 July 10 - 13 Summer FUN US Coins Signature Auction -Orlando
Consignment Deadline: May 27, 2014

David Mayfield
Vice President, Numismatic Auctions
David@HA.com
1-800-US-COINS ext. 1000

Interested in Selling?
What's My Coin Worth?
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May 16 American Indian and Tribal Art Signature Auction -Dallas #5169 May 16 American Indian and Tribal Art Signature Auction -Dallas #7093
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May 17 Texas Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5170 May 17 Texas Art Signature Auction - Dallas #5170
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May 22 Timepieces Signature Auction - New York #5177 May 22 Timepieces Signature Auction - New York #5177
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May 28 The Reid Collection of Mechanical Models Signature Auction - Dallas #5181 May 28 The Reid Collection of Mechanical Models Signature Auction - Dallas #5181
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April 27
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