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    Description

    1931 Saint-Gaudens Twenty, MS66
    Elusive Late-Series Issue
    Only One Finer Certified

    1931 $20 MS66 PCGS. There was little commercial demand for double eagles in the shrinking national economy in 1931, but the coins were still needed for currency reserves. Accordingly, a large mintage of 2,938,250 Saint-Gaudens double eagles was struck at the Philadelphia Mint during the last quarter of that year and held in Mint and Treasury vaults as part of the nation's gold reserves. Roger W. Burdette notes that no coins were sent to Federal Reserve Banks for distribution. As a result, the great majority of the mintage was still in government storage when the Gold Recall took effect in 1933. All of those coins (2,937,750 pieces) were subsequently melted and stored as gold bars at the Fort Knox Bullion Depository. Of the remaining 500 coins, 158 were destroyed in Annual and Special Assays in 1931 and another 32 examples were turned in to be melted by the Treasurer's Office in 1934. Subtracting all these pieces from the reported mintage leaves only 310 examples that were ever available to the general public. An unknown number of those coins were purchased by private individuals from the Mint Cashier and the Treasurer's Office before 1933, but it is doubtful that more than 110 specimens survive today, almost all in Mint State grades. Examples are eagerly sought by collectors today and any auction appearance is a notable numismatic event.

    The present coin is among the finest survivors of this famous date, which David Akers considered the sixth rarest issue of the 53-coin series. This delightful Premium Gem exhibits razor-sharp definition on all design elements, aside from some localized softness on the letters IN G in the motto on the reverse. The impeccably preserved orange-gold surfaces radiate vibrant mint luster, with outstanding eye appeal. This lot represents an important opportunity for the series specialist. Population: 11 in 66, 1 finer (1/20).(Registry values: N10218)

    Coin Index Numbers: (NGC ID# 26GN, PCGS# 9192)

    Weight: 33.44 grams

    Metal: 90% Gold, 10% Copper


    Learn more at the Newman Numismatic Portal at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    February, 2020
    20th-23rd Thursday-Sunday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 23
    Lot Tracking Activity: N/A
    Page Views: 2,519

    Buyer's Premium per Lot:
    20% of the successful bid (minimum $19) per lot.

    Saint-Gaudens Double Eagles as Illustrated by the Phillip H. Morse and Steven Duckor Collections
    Revised Edition by Roger Burdette, and edited by James L. Halperin and Mark Van Winkle

    Saint-Gaudens Double Eagles is an issue-by-issue examination of this artistically inspired series of gold coins. Each date and mintmark is reviewed with up-to-date information, much of which has never been previously published. The book is based on two extraordinary collections: The Phillip H. Morse Collection and the Dr. and Mrs. Steven L. Duckor Collection.

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    We also followed the bidding online yesterday here in Salt Lake for the other 3 coins - great fun. Prices realized met or exceeded our expectations.
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